Pope Francis Tells Synod15 Bishops to Butt Out of Communion Discussion

By The The Pope’s Fool News Service
March 29, 2015

The Popes Fool News Service (We Make Stuff Up)VATICAN CITY (TPF) — While generally not one to take topics off the table for discussion (except for the ordination of women), Pope Francis has advised his bishops not to waste a lot of time in the upcoming Synod of Bishops discussing whether divorced and remarried Catholics should continue to be barred from receiving the Eucharist. In his homily earlier this week, the Pope said that the whole question centers on ideology rather than on mercy, so it should be dropped. The bishops should not worry about giving “instructions from on high” and “not be obsessed by the thought of divorced Catholics receiving Communion.” This “focus on appearances” is not important.

Pope FrancisHe further pointed out that the resolution of this question is really not up to them. “When I was a boy, I was taught that the sacraments were instituted by Christ to give grace, and we that receive this grace as long as our souls have the right dispositions. The current Catechism,” he continued,“preserves this teaching. But it does not instruct the clergy to put themselves in the middle of making that judgment.”

As he has done in the past, the Pope warned against being a Church driven by small-minded rules. “Ministers of the Church must be ministers of mercy above all.” Just put the question aside, he advised. Don’t worry about “appearances,” and “leave the sacramental giving of grace where it belongs – between the communicant and God.”

Pope Francis Issues Starter Catechism for U.S. Bishops

By The The Pope’s Fool News Service
November 14, 2014

The Popes Fool News Service (We Make Stuff Up)VATICAN CITY (TPF) — The Vatican has released a short, basic catechism of the faith designed for the U.S. bishops and approved by Pope Francis.

Based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church, this special Bishop’s Edition encapsulates the foundations of Christianity, walking the reader through the moral hierarchy of the New Testament by way of its parables. It starts with a meditation on the greatest commandment, “And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and you shall love your neighbor as yourself, there are no other commandments greater than these.” Each subsequent chapter focuses on key moral concepts and their related parables, including God’s Love, Mercy, and Forgiveness (the parable of the lost sheep, the parable of the lost coin, and the parable of the prodigal son), Christian Love (the parable of the good Samaritan and the parable of the unmerciful servant), and Self-Righteousness and Humility (the parable of the pharisee and the tax collector). The Bishop’s Edition also includes summaries of the theological virtues, the cardinal virtues, and the Gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Pope Francis

Included as well is an appendix on the natural law. A Vatican source, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he is prohibited from publicly discussing the matter, explained its importance. “The bishops really have no clue about the natural law, which quite honestly, Pope Francis finds rather annoying. Look at nature and derive morality from that? Really? They need to read their Aquinas. We hope this little catechism helps.”